As unique and daring a product as Google Glass is, it’s hard not to dislike its users. Glass users (or “Glassholes” in contemporary snark) are displaying not so much their hipness with technology, but their access to exclusivity. Google Glass is difficult to get and expensive to buy; in that sense, it’s no different than a fine watch. However, Glass also comes along with a critique of everyone else’s existence. Mere reality is not enough for Glass users; they need enhancements. Let the peasants be un-augmented.

New technologies that expand our choices and enable better communication are usually embraced, not mocked. Think of how excited millions of people get with the latest iPhone update. You’d think a whole new technology category like Glass would be embraced. But the context of any new technology is more important than the technology itself in determining its reception in the marketplace. As long as Glass signals exclusivity, glassholes will be mocked.